Curry school forms Etc. Club for ‘misfits and nerds’
by Briana Webster
Oct 09, 2013 | 1919 views | 0 0 comments | 42 42 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Curry High School’s Etc. Club members enjoy a plethora of activities in teacher and sponsor Nelly Fielding’s classroom. Pictured are officers Dakota Snead, president; William Englebert, vice president; Eric McCain, treasurer; and Michael Nordmann, secretary. Daily Mountain Eagle - Briana Webster
Curry High School’s Etc. Club members enjoy a plethora of activities in teacher and sponsor Nelly Fielding’s classroom. Pictured are officers Dakota Snead, president; William Englebert, vice president; Eric McCain, treasurer; and Michael Nordmann, secretary. Daily Mountain Eagle - Briana Webster
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Ever feel like you don’t belong? What do kids do at school if they’re not ball players, cheerleaders or band members? 

Curry High School teacher Nelly Fielding has started a club that’s a first of its kind in Walker County called the Curry Etc. Club.

Students feel free to play video games, chess, music, card games ... etc, which is also how the club got its name.

“This is a club of very creative kids. Most of them are not involved in student government, or this or that. They’re just creative; that’s what this club is all about,” Fielding said. “Two clubs merged into one, and I wasn’t sure how they were going to get along. ... It was the music, anime, chess and video games club. The secretary [at the school] said, ‘The music, video ... the etc. club,’ and she ended up naming the club.” 

The club consists of 30 to 40 members from ninth through twelfth grade, Fielding added.

Several students gathered Friday, Sept. 27, for a meeting in Fielding’s colorful Spanish class.

Officers of the club include: president, Dakota Snead; vice president, William Englebert; secretary, Michael Nordmann; and treasurer, Eric McCain — who are all seniors.

“It’s a club for those who have nothing else they can offer to Curry; it’s a club of misfits and nerds, I guess you could say,” Snead articulately said. “Just here to be yourself and here to have fun.” 

“We usually go out together to go to movies or hang out; it’s a club to where friends can come together without being judged by who they are or what they like,” Englebert added. “We go out to movies, Kami-Con, which is a convention where you get to dress up as characters, eat and hang out. It’s just a great club to come together with a lot of friends and to make good friends.” 

Snead and Englebert’s dress attire was somewhat out of the ordinary for a run-of-the-mill school day, but they both said they like to wear suits at least once a week.

Nordmann chuckled, “I feel slightly underdressed,” as he sat down among the other members. A number of students were fully engulfed in video games while one girl painted, another played the guitar, a few played chess, some played card games and two others viewed different videos online.

“It really does help a lot of people though because there’s a lot of people who don’t have anything else they can do at Curry because they’re not athletic. It’s true, if I wouldn’t have been in this or Spanish Club, I wouldn’t have had anything else I could have offered Curry,” Snead said. “It really does help a lot.”

Snead and Englebert agreed that the club is not only a creative outlet, but it also encourages students to get out of their shells.

They spoke of one student who graduated last year from Curry that really opened up and was able to express himself because of the club.

“That’s what we are. That’s just us in a nutshell,” Snead said.

The chess extension of the club travels to Walker High School every now and then to compete, for fun, against other area students. Officers say it’s more of a social gathering rather than serious chess competitions. Among talks of adding a book club to the mix this year, the students also raved about upcoming trips to the Alabama Renaissance Faire in Florence and Kami-Con in Birmingham. The senior officers have big plans after graduating from high school, but each one hopes to leave something positive for others to follow at Curry.

“They enjoy it. I hear all week long, ‘Mrs. Fielding, are we meeting Friday, are we meeting Friday?’” Fielding said with a smile. “... I didn’t know how it was going to work, but it does. This club has brought a lot of kids out of their shells.”