In Walker County, voters say ‘yes’ to budget proposal
by James Phillips
Sep 19, 2012 | 1954 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Sgt. Ralph Williams, an investigator with the Walker County Sheriff’s Office, announces the arrival of representatives from area polling sites at the CHS Activities Center in Jasper Tuesday night. - Photo by: James Phillips.
Sgt. Ralph Williams, an investigator with the Walker County Sheriff’s Office, announces the arrival of representatives from area polling sites at the CHS Activities Center in Jasper Tuesday night. - Photo by: James Phillips.
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Walker County results were almost identical to statewide numbers in Tuesday’s vote on a proposed constitutional amendment.

A little less than 65 percent of voters in Walker County supported withdrawing $437 million from a state trust fund to help balance the General Fund budget for the next three years. With 46 of 47 precincts counted, 5,461 county residents voted for the amendment, while 2,964 voted against the idea. The remaining precinct was a handful of provisional votes. The results in Walker County were tabulated at the Community Health Systems Activities Center in downtown Jasper. It took almost two hours for votes from around the county to be returned.

The 8,425 votes cast in Tuesday’s single-issue election was 18.66 percent of Walker County’s registered voters.

Probate Judge Rick Allison said the local turnout was much higher than he expected.

“I expected it to be somewhere from 8 to 10 percent,” he said. “For this type of election, I think this was a good turnout.”

Allison said the voting process was smooth.

“We just didn’t see many problems at all,” he said.

Workers at some area polling sites were able to utilize some new technology during Tuesday’s vote. Allison said recently purchased iPads, programmed with the county’s voters list, were used at four polling areas.

“We received seven iPads, but we just got them in Monday,” Allison said. “I took them to four of our larger polling places and taught the workers how to use them. If there is a question about a voter, they can look it up on the iPads in just a few seconds.”

While setting up at the CHS Building Tuesday, Allison said he encountered a few voters who mistakenly showed up there to cast their ballots.

“I had one of the iPads with me, and I was able to look up their names and tell them where they needed to go to vote,” he said.