NED Show entertains students
by Rachel Davis
Sep 01, 2012 | 1656 views | 0 0 comments | 8 8 recommendations | email to a friend | print
John Mothershead of the NED Show performed a series of tricks with several yoyos to keep the kids of Sumiton Elementary/Middle School entertained Friday during a message about bullying. Photo by: Rachel Davis
John Mothershead of the NED Show performed a series of tricks with several yoyos to keep the kids of Sumiton Elementary/Middle School entertained Friday during a message about bullying. Photo by: Rachel Davis
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SUMITON — Students at Sumiton Elementary/Middle School spent a portion of their Friday learning about preventing bullying from John Mothershead of The NED Show, which bills itself as “America’s most popular school assembly.”

The program uses yo-yos and balloons to keep kids entertained and promote messages of character building to school children. The presentation is called “How to Become a Champion at School and in Life” and has been shared with more than 19 million kids in the United States, England, Australia and Canada.

The 45-minute presentation emphasizes the three cornerstones of the NED program: Never give up; Encourage others; and Do your best. The program was created by Arne Dixon, who has been in the business since 1984.

SEMS Principal Paige Skalnik said The NED Show had been to the school before, and was a big hit with the students. Last year, she said the school and the program couldn’t find a date that worked for both so she booked this year’s date in advance. She said she believes it is important to continue to teach students about what constitutes bullying, since that is such a hot topic in schools now.

“It’s important to teach the students what bullying really is,” Skalnik said. “We want to teach them not to be a bully, as well as teaching them how to not be bullied.”

Although teachers and school administrators teach anti-bullying messages daily, Skalnik said the format of this program gives a new dimension to the lesson.

“It’s visual, not just some talking head telling them what to do or what not to do,” Skalnik said. “It teaches them how to incorporate it into their everyday lives.”

Skalnik said the program was provided to the school at no cost, but the representative sold yo-yos to help pay for the program and allow it to continue traveling to more schools.

“We need more messages and more programs like this,” Skalnik said.