Reed gives funds for Bevill State’s nursing program IV simulator
by Staff Reports
Oct 02, 2012 | 1490 views | 0 0 comments | 7 7 recommendations | email to a friend | print
State Sen. Greg Reed (R-Jasper) and Bevill State President Dr. Anne McNutt watch as nursing student Jonny Rosales uses the IV simulator. Additional nursing students watching the demonstration are, from left, Michael Parkhurst, LeConyea Duncan and Candice Hopper. - Photo Special to the Eagle.
State Sen. Greg Reed (R-Jasper) and Bevill State President Dr. Anne McNutt watch as nursing student Jonny Rosales uses the IV simulator. Additional nursing students watching the demonstration are, from left, Michael Parkhurst, LeConyea Duncan and Candice Hopper. - Photo Special to the Eagle.
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State Sen. Greg Reed recently donated $8,000 to pay for an IV simulator for the area's nursing students.

The piece of equipment will be used in Bevill State Community College's Health Science division. It allows nursing students to practice running an IV without actually endangering a patient.

“Simulators give students hands-on experiences before going through real-life situations. Students can do something the right way or the wrong way and see the consequences of their actions. With this method, learning is enhanced and perfected before a student ever sees a live patient,” said Penne Mott, Dean of Health Sciences at Bevill State.

Reed, the chairman of the Senate Health Committee, said the money for the simulator came from his discretionary funds.

“I have  little resources available to me, but I want them used to make a real difference in the education of students. These simulators take health science training to the next level," Reed said.

Representatives with Bevill's nursing program said the IV simulator is a standard training piece and every nursing program should have one. At Bevill State, nursing students must log at least three hours of training on the simulator during a semester course.

“Learning one of the most routine nursing tasks is made more interesting by learning in an interactive environment," said Stephanie Adair, a member of the nursing faculty at Bevill State.

"The students want to practice over and over again because it becomes a game, and they get upset when they don’t score well. On a nursing process where repetition is critical, we see this as a great situation.”