Rescues from Sumiton shelter recovering well
by Rachel Davis
Jul 20, 2013 | 1932 views | 0 0 comments | 34 34 recommendations | email to a friend | print
This puppy, named “Otis” by his caregivers, was the worst of the rescued dogs. Rachel Nelson of Crossroads Animal Clinic said he loves playing with toys in the grass and is on his way to a full recovery. Photo courtesy of Crossroads Animal Hospital
This puppy, named “Otis” by his caregivers, was the worst of the rescued dogs. Rachel Nelson of Crossroads Animal Clinic said he loves playing with toys in the grass and is on his way to a full recovery. Photo courtesy of Crossroads Animal Hospital
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“The Sumiton 26,” the name given to the last rescues pulled from Save Our Strays/Nonnie’s Angels in Sumiton last month, are recovering well at Crossroads Animal Clinic.

The animals were among more than 100 that shelter organizers said were living in the building with no air and in what rescue workers called “deplorable conditions.”

According to the veterinarian who removed the animals from the shelter, they are all expected to make a full recovery and she hopes to find a home for all the animals soon.

“We’ve had a lot of adopters and rescues stepping up to help with the dogs, but we still need more and we need a lot of help placing the cats,” Rachel Nelson, veterinarian at Crossroads said.

She said all the dogs were very sweet and playful and most were under a year old. The oldest dog, a striking white male with blue eyes, is only about 2 years old.

Many of the dogs still have hair missing, but it is beginning to regrow and Nelson said she expects them to look normal within a few months.

The cats are also mostly young and include several kittens. Nelson said they are very sweet and cuddly and would make great pets for families. The one elderly cat, who is missing many teeth, had an old fracture to her rear leg that was left untreated and healed poorly, but she is doing well and is also up for adoption or rescue.

“They all just have amazing personalities, and we want to see them find great homes,” Nelson said.

The dogs were treated for demodex and sarcoptic mange, and both the dogs and cats were treated for internal parasites, ear mites, flea infestation and eye and respiratory infections. Nelson said the animals did not have serious, long-term medical issues but were in need of basic care.

Only one of the animals (the elderly cat) was spayed or neutered, but Nelson said they will all be fixed and vaccinated before they leave Crossroads.

“The costs continue to mount the longer the animals are here, and the more we spay and neuter, so we are hoping to find homes for them all soon,” Nelson said.

Sumiton’s city council this week denied a request from the former operators of the shelter to reopen the facility in any capacity that would house animals, although they said they wouldn’t oppose a thrift store to raise money for the debts incurred by the shelter. Sumiton police said there was still a pending criminal investigation into the shelter management.

For more before and after photos, visit Crossroads Animal Hospital’s Facebook page at www.facebook.com/crossroadsah. To donate, adopt or foster, contact Crossroads at 1826 Carl Jones Road, Moody, Alabama 35004, or call (205) 640-4327.