30 cats altered in ongoing WCHS efforts

By NICOLE SMITH
Posted 4/21/19

The Walker County Humane Society (WCHS) is continuing to reduce the county's feral, stray cat population.Thirty cats were spayed and neutered in another cat fixing sponsored by the nonprofit, at no …

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30 cats altered in ongoing WCHS efforts

Posted

The Walker County Humane Society (WCHS) is continuing to reduce the county's feral, stray cat population.

Thirty cats were spayed and neutered in another cat fixing sponsored by the nonprofit, at no cost to pet owners. 

The surgeries were performed by Dr. Martin Roberts at Jasper Veterinary Clinic on April 14. Roberts also altered 50 cats during another Walker County Humane Society cat fixing in February.

"It may not look like it's making a dent, but I know it's making a dent," Roberts said. "We had quite a few pregnant and in season, and each one of those that we do is saving seven or eight kittens from hitting the street."

He said most of the cats altered were feral cats, and nine cats were brought in by one family.

WCHS Board Director Susie Vann said the 80 cat spay and neuters performed this year with funds from their nonprofit doesn't count the number of people they have helped on an individual basis.

Vann said cat fixings are vital due to how quickly cats can reproduce.

"The Humane Society of the United States tells us that one female cat and all of her offspring over the course of seven years can produce 420,000 cats," she said. 

The goal of the WCHS program is to do one dog and one cat spay and neuter clinic each quarter. Each time the nonprofit has announced on Facebook that a spay/neuter clinic will be held, spots have filled up within hours.  

"We think there's more people who want to take advantage of the program," Vann said. "We have found these low-cost or no-cost, one- and two-day events are wildly popular and successful."

WCHS plans to hold another dog fixing in May, where 45 dogs will be spayed and neutered. Vann will announce the official date on her Facebook page in the coming weeks, along with information on registering. At their last dog fixing in December, pet owners were only required to pay $15 for a rabies vaccine.

Outside of spay and neuter clinics, WCHS board member Dee O'Mary said 12 adult cats and 23 kittens are part of their program, and some are available for adoption at Pet Depot in Jasper. Since their partnership with Pet Depot began, nearly 700 cats have been rescued in Walker County.

Rescuers United For Furbabies co-founder Marsha Miller said they, too, are trying to help reduce the number of stray cats in the county.

"We're also going to work on a trap, neuter and release of a feral cat colony in Parrish," she said.

Trap, neuter and release (TNR) efforts in Walker County have been successful for WCHS as well, resulting in dozens of cats being altered and returned to their familiar locations.