Arrest made in Cordova break-in

Posted 9/29/17

By JENNIFER COHRON

Daily Mountain Eagle

Two recent arrests likely prevented a series of break-ins in Cordova, where property crimes are at a five-year low, Police Chief Nick Smith said this …

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Arrest made in Cordova break-in

Posted

By JENNIFER COHRON

Daily Mountain Eagle

Two recent arrests likely prevented a series of break-ins in Cordova, where property crimes are at a five-year low, Police Chief Nick Smith said this week.

Timothy Kyle Sawyer, 26, and Michael Douglas Shemwell, 27, were arrested on Saturday, Sept. 23 after a resident reported seeing two white males carrying a window air conditioner unit down the street.

The air conditioner, which had been taken from a residence on Dixon Street, was recovered by Officer Krimson Culverson.

Sawyer is charged with fourth degree theft of property, using a false identity to obstruct justice and third degree criminal mischief. Shemwell is charged with fourth degree receiving stolen property.

“During the investigation, we received information from one of the individuals that the other individual had moved down from Nauvoo two weeks ago and was planning various thefts in the community,” Smith said.

The theft marked the 12th property crime of the year in the city, a record low for the department.

“The things we’ve done have been about making this a place that you don’t want to come to commit crimes,” Smith said.

The arrest also raised concerns from Smith regarding a recent order from Judge Jerry Selman that requires unsecured bonds.

After his arrest in Cordova, Sawyer was held at the Walker County Jail as a result of an outstanding warrant with no bond. Otherwise, he would have been immediately released, according to Smith. “I agree that we shouldn’t keep people in jail just because they don’t have means to make bond, but I think we should keep them for a reasonable amount of time. Even before this order, if someone hadn’t made bond, they were getting an indigency hearing with our judge or magistrate within 48 hours. Then some would stay longer, and some would get released,” Smith said.