Cat Fixin' helps control county's cat population

By NICOLE SMITH, Daily Mountain Eagle
Posted 9/23/17

FARMSTEAD — Farmstead Veterinary Medical Center went to the cats on Friday, as spay and neuter procedures were well underway to alter 200 county cats.

Dr. Jeremiah Alexander said he began spaying and neutering cats Thursday evening, and had …

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Cat Fixin' helps control county's cat population

Posted

FARMSTEAD — Farmstead Veterinary Medical Center went to the cats on Friday, as spay and neuter procedures were well underway to alter 200 county cats.

Dr. Jeremiah Alexander said he began spaying and neutering cats Thursday evening, and had already neutered roughly 20 more cats by noon Friday — all while still caring for the medical center’s sick animals, with the help of many staff and veterinary technicians.

The Walker County Humane Society (an organization that helps with spay and neuter procedures for county animals) sponsored the Cat Fixin’ — free of charge for domesticated and feral cats — made possible by donations from the Walker Area Community Foundation, The Remy Fund and a generous donation from an anonymous donor. Cats are also receiving flea medication during the clinic for free.

Alexander said a typical neuter surgery takes around one or two minutes, with spays averaging 10 minutes. He said the most time consuming aspect of the process is necessary sedation.

Nearly 50 cats filled a portion of the clinic on Friday morning, either awaiting surgery or pick up. Board members with the Walker County Humane Society said they were receiving more domesticated than feral cats, but are happy the clinic will result in fewer homeless cats on the streets of Walker County.

Humane Society board member Susie Vann previously told the Daily Mountain Eagle, “We’re going to try to help get the cat population under control. It was said to me today, ... ‘Cats can’t add or subtract, but they sure can multiply.’”

Spay and neuter surgeries will continue today, and Alexander previously reported that all surgery slots have been filled.

Last year, Rescuers United For Furbabies, in partnership with the Animal Hospital of Walker County, also held a feral cat spay and neuter clinic that resulted in the alteration of nearly 200 cats.

A total of 400 cats will have been altered in Walker County as a result of both cat spay/neuter clinics.

The Walker Area Community Foundation also helped fund the Animal Hospital of Walker County’s TNR (trap, neuter, return) day, with the help of another anonymous donor.

All feral cats that were spayed or neutered will have one ear tipped before being released, as a marker the cat has been altered.