City, county schools report some flu cases

By NICOLE SMITH, Daily Mountain Eagle
Posted 2/25/17

Despite increased cases of the flu causing schools to close for disinfection in some school districts, Walker County and Jasper City Schools are not reporting a significant outbreak of illness.

Jasper City Schools Superintendent Dr. Ann Jackson …

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City, county schools report some flu cases

Posted

Despite increased cases of the flu causing schools to close for disinfection in some school districts, Walker County and Jasper City Schools are not reporting a significant outbreak of illness.

Jasper City Schools Superintendent Dr. Ann Jackson said attendance numbers for the district are down slightly, due to flu and strep throat cases.

“We typically average 95 percent attendance system-wide, and we have been running around 93 percent for the past two weeks,” Jackson said. ”Our school policy requires that students be fever-free for 24 hours before returning to school.”

Dr. Jason Adkins, superintendent of Walker County Schools, said there has been an average of 15-20 flu cases per school; however, Lupton Jr. High School has had a more significant number of students diagnosed with flu, 47.

Adkins said the school system ordered disinfecting foggers as flu cases became apparent. Lupton is the only school to request using the fogger so far, and will be fogged to kill germs this weekend.

“That’s typically what we do when it gets to the point where it looks like it is just spreading rampantly,” Adkins said. “It has been proven successful to take that approach.”

Dr. Patrick Hyland of Dabbs and Hyland PC said they have diagnosed flu cases at their office, as well as other illnesses.

“We’ve had some cases of the flu, and we’ve also had some children diagnosed with respiratory illness, viruses and strep throat,” Hyland said.

Both school districts are taking many measures to disinfect schools, while also encouraging habits that help decrease the spread of germs.

“Our teaches, custodians and principals have been diligent in using Clorox wipes in the afternoons, using Lysol and making sure students are using soap and water and hand sanitizers after going to the restrooms and before going to lunch,” Jackson said. “Early in the month, in anticipation of the flu season, we started stressing the importance of washing hands, keeping hands away from the face and mouth and covering the mouth and nose when sneezing.”

Adkins said they are beginning to see attendance climb again, and he said they are fortunate no schools had to be closed because of a significantly high number of flu cases.

“It’s enough to be concerned, but not enough to think that you’ve got a widespread epidemic like some school systems have,” Adkins said.