Council considers ordinance to address stray animal problem

By JENNIFER COHRON, Daily Mountain Eagle
Posted 12/2/17

CORDOVA — The Cordova City Council is considering a new ordinance to address the increasing number of stray dogs in the city.

A draft presented at Tuesday night’s council meeting is more expansive than the dog ordinance adopted in 2010, city attorney Ben Goldman told council members.

The ordinance also clarifies the procedure for getting strays off the street.

This item is available in full to subscribers.

Please log in to continue

E-mail
Password
Log in

Don't have an ID?


Print subscribers

If you're a print subscriber, but do not yet have an online account, click here to create one.

Non-subscribers

Click here to see your options for becoming a subscriber.

Council considers ordinance to address stray animal problem

Posted

CORDOVA — The Cordova City Council is considering a new ordinance to address the increasing number of stray dogs in the city.

A draft presented at Tuesday night’s council meeting is more expansive than the dog ordinance adopted in 2010, city attorney Ben Goldman told council members.

The ordinance also clarifies the procedure for getting strays off the street.

Any animal found running at large can be picked up and impounded by “the city, the county or one of their designees,” the ordinance states.

The ordinance makes animal owners legally responsible for all fees associated with impounding an animal.

Fees are doubled for second offenses and tripled for third offenses.

Other sections of the ordinance address animal cruelty, vicious animals and animals that constitute a public nuisance. The latter covers a wide range of offenses, including animals that turn over garbage cans, bark excessively or snap at passers-by.

“One thing I think this ordinance will do that others fail to do is that it makes each animal that exists in violation of the ordinance a separate offense,” Goldman said.

The ordinance has been provided to members of the city’s police department for review.

“The key to an ordinance like this is making sure all the players involved are comfortable with their ability to enforce it,” he said.

The city does not employ an animal control officer.

Mayor Drew Gilbert said Tuesday night that he will be in conversation with leaders of local animal rescue groups that have helped the city in the past.