Senior living residents embrace adult coloring craze

By JENNIFER COHRON, Daily Mountain Eagle
Posted 10/1/16

Two months ago, Raymond Muncher had never picked up a colored pencil. Now he can’t put them down.

Muncher is one of several residents at HarborChase whose adult coloring book artwork is currently on display throughout the assisted living …

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Senior living residents embrace adult coloring craze

Posted

Two months ago, Raymond Muncher had never picked up a colored pencil. Now he can’t put them down.

Muncher is one of several residents at HarborChase whose adult coloring book artwork is currently on display throughout the assisted living facility.

“Time really flies when you’re coloring,” Muncher said.

Darlene Hubbard, the life enrichment coordinator at HarborChase, introduced adult coloring books to the residents two months ago at the request of Magdalene Booth, who enjoyed coloring long before it became the latest fad.

“I was aware of it, but I just didn’t think about it being that interesting,” Hubbard said.

Booth loaned an adult coloring book purchased by her daughter to Hubbard, who made copies of the pages for other residents.

When she realized how proud they were of their work, she provided them with binders and sheet protectors so they could save their coloring sheets and show them off.

Some of the pictures turned out so well that Hubbard started framing them.

“It has really brought out the artist in all of them. I think some of them who didn’t think they had it in them have surprised themselves,” she said.

Even residents in HarborChase’s memory care unit who sometimes struggle to focus have tried their hand at coloring.

Although they are coloring the same pictures, the finished products are as unique as the residents themselves.

“Most people colored this like a flamingo, which it is, but I made mine into a blue heron,” Joyce Jackson said, pointing at one of the pictures in her binder.

Because there is no right or wrong way to color, residents can take their time and let their imagination take over.

Simple images — a boy fishing by a pond, an old pickup truck — take them back to happier days.

“I find myself thinking about things that I had forgotten. It heals your mind in a way,” Muncher said.