‘Stop the Bleed’ program visits Walker County, offers bleeding control training

Posted 11/17/17

By LEA RIZZO

Daily Mountain Eagle

Members of the trauma department at UAB visited two Walker County schools Wednesday to provide education on techniques to stop life-threatening bleeding, as …

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‘Stop the Bleed’ program visits Walker County, offers bleeding control training

Posted

By LEA RIZZO

Daily Mountain Eagle

Members of the trauma department at UAB visited two Walker County schools Wednesday to provide education on techniques to stop life-threatening bleeding, as part of the national Stop the Bleed program.

The Stop the Bleed website (www.bleedingcontrol.org) states that “the purpose of the campaign is to build national resilience by better preparing the public to save lives by raising awareness of basic actions to stop life-threatening bleeding following everyday emergencies and man-made and natural disasters.”

During the training session at the Walker County Center of Technology, Holly Waller, director of Trauma and Burn Services at UAB, taught attendees about tourniquet and wound-packing techniques, as well as bleeding control kits.

“This came up as a result of the Hartford Consensus after the Sandy Hook shooting,” Waller said ahead of her presentation Wednesday. “In that review, they found that a lot of those children died because they bled to death. Simple bleeding control techniques can save lives.” People can die from life-threatening bleeding in five to seven minutes, she explained, and wounds to the arms and the legs are the most common source of preventable death from bleeding.

She added that, during mass casualty events, a lot of people don’t realize that if the scene isn’t secure in mass casualty events, paramedics cannot get in to help people and it can sometimes take four to six hours for them to be allowed to enter.

During her presentation, Waller spoke about the use of bleeding controls kits, which contain a tourniquet, gauze, gloves and directions for use, which she said are a great help to people in mass casualty or other situations with serious injuries. She said the kits can be used in the event of a car wreck or industrial event or other such incidents when someone is bleeding heavily.

“Our goal is to have bleeding control kits in every classroom. We’d love to have them in every classroom in Alabama,” Waller said. However, the funding needed to obtain enough kits is still an issue. But Waller said that the program is gaining more momentum and they often now have churches contacting them about bleeding control training to be part of their disaster preparedness plans.

She advised attendees to ensure their own safety before trying to help others, no matter the situation. She also went over the ABCs of bleeding, which include being Alert and calling 911; finding the source of the Bleeding; and then Compressing to help stem the wound’s bleeding.

Wednesday marked the first time the group has conducted any training of this kind in Walker County. Around 30 teachers went through the training at Lupton Junior High and approximately 30 school nurses went through the training at WCCT.

“We want to be proactive in the Walker County Board of Education and be trained in case something does happen,” said Margaret Guthrie, lead nurse for the Walker County Board of Education, in her introduction of the program and Waller.

Waller said the hope is for bleeding control to eventually become as common as CPR or other first aid training that people generally have.