Lone protester takes on Tea Party
by Jennifer Cohron
Oct 23, 2010 | 2578 views | 0 0 comments | 23 23 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Nancy Scott protested the Thursday night meeting of the Rainy Day Patriots Tea Party of Walker County. Photo by Jennifer Cohron
Nancy Scott protested the Thursday night meeting of the Rainy Day Patriots Tea Party of Walker County. Photo by Jennifer Cohron
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Nancy Scott attended a meeting of the Rainy Day Patriots Tea Party of Walker County on Thursday night, but not as a supporter.

Scott spent the evening silently marching up and down the sidewalk in front of the CHS Building in Jasper wearing two protest signs.

One read, “Tea? No! Make Mine Coffee!” The other had a slightly stronger message — “Tea? No! Filter Them Out!”

Scott said she had the signs prepared for one of the group’s large rallies several months ago, but a death in the family prevented her from going then.

Scott heard several people talking about her and laughing before going into the meeting, and one woman tried to start a heated exchange.

However, Scott was determined to hold a peaceful protest.

“I was not there for a fight. I had a message,” she said.

Although Scott has never held political office, activism is nothing new for her.

She once successfully lobbied state Rep. Tom Hogan to get liability insurance for foster parents like herself.

In 1990, she was a candidate for District 14 in the Alabama House of Representatives.

Scott said she decided to run after one politician turned his back on her while he was campaigning and asked for her husband’s support instead.

“I figured he didn’t know that women had the vote, and I was going to show him,” Scott said.

Scott is a self-described yellow dog Democrat who said she asked for forgiveness after once voting for Ronald Reagan.

Scott said she is concerned about what some of the Tea Party’s stances, including abolishing the Department of Education, would mean for the future of the nation’s children.

Scott said she can’t stay silent any longer, and she doesn’t mind being the lone protester.

“It just takes one voice to be heard,” Scott said.