Garbage truck will increase productivity, reduce emissions
by Daniel Gaddy
Jul 01, 2012 | 2109 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Jasper’s new garbage truck is expected to allow its driver to dispose of 600 cans of trash per day. Photo by: Jerry Geddings
Jasper’s new garbage truck is expected to allow its driver to dispose of 600 cans of trash per day. Photo by: Jerry Geddings
slideshow
An official with the City of Jasper says a new garbage truck will not only result in lower emissions but also lead to increased productivity in the sanitation department.

Jon Geddings, superintendent of sanitation for the City of Jasper, said the new truck will allow the driver to dispose of 600 cans of trash per day. He said the city’s older trucks can get rid of 500 cans each day.

“He (the driver) is pretty much going to be banging out a can a minute,” Geddings said.

Mayor Sonny Posey said the new truck, which cost $240,000, will likely have a better fuel economy than the sanitation department’s older vehicles.

Geddings said the truck accomplishes lower emissions when sanitation workers mix a chemical called urea into the vehicle’s diesel fuel. He said the compound is actually produced from animal urine.

“Which is pretty gross,” he joked.

Geddings said the real benefit will be from the reduction in repair costs compared to the older trucks, which were purchased in 2003 for $200,000.

“If any city gets its money’s worth out of its equipment it’s certainly the city of Jasper,” Posey said.

Geddings said one of the 2003 models can be used as a back-up vehicle, which the state requires.

“The new Mack (truck) will be our hoss, so to speak,” he said.

Jasper’s sanitation department has three residential garbage trucks, three commercial trucks and one rear-loader for alleyways and handicapped customers. Jasper’s sanitation department collects anywhere from 900 to 1,100 tons of garbage every month, Geddings said.

The City of Jasper went to an automated garbage collection system nearly a decade ago. Posey said the move has helped the city significantly lower its workers’ compensation claims. He said that before moving to an automated system, city leaders received a worker’s compensation claim from a sanitation employee on a monthly basis.