The art of yard sales
by Jennifer Cohron
Jul 23, 2012 | 3281 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Kenny Blackmon looks over the tool table at his family’s recent yard sale. Blackmon said the tools brought quite a few men out to the sale on Friday on Hubbard Loop. Photo by: Jennifer Cohron
Kenny Blackmon looks over the tool table at his family’s recent yard sale. Blackmon said the tools brought quite a few men out to the sale on Friday on Hubbard Loop. Photo by: Jennifer Cohron
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CORDOVA — At his family’s recent yard sale, Kenny Blackmon gave customers the same thing he looks for when he is on their side of the shopping table — a good bargain.

Blackmon said deep discounts aren’t necessary. Taking just a dollar or two off of an item’s asking price is usually enough to secure a sale.

“They think they’ve got something on you then. It’s just a mind game,” he said.

Blackmon added that he loves to negotiate, whether he is buying or selling.

Like many experienced yard salers, he has sometimes walked away from an item he wanted because he and the owner couldn’t come to terms on a deal only to return later in the day to make one final offer.

More than once, he came home empty-handed because the item had sold in his absence.

“That’s just the chance you take,” Blackmon said.

The money Blackmon and his family earned at their yard sale this weekend will be used to buy uniforms for his daughter, the drum major at Cordova High School.

Blackmon was able to maximize their profits by including some items he had purchased over the years at other yard sales, auctions and outlet malls.

Blackmon already had several hundred dollars in hand Friday afternoon in spite of the line of showers that moved through Walker County shortly after he and his stepdaughter, Brylee, set up that morning.

Most of the items scattered across the front yard of Blackmon’s friend’s house on Hubbard Loop were typical yard sale fare – clothes, toys, VHS tapes, a washer and dryer and a mini fridge.

However, the table that had gotten the most attention all day was the one that held Blackmon’s collection of tools.

Blackmon said listing tools on a yard sale road sign or newspaper ad is one of the best ways to draw in customers because men appreciate having something to browse while their wives sort through clothes and knickknacks.

One of the customers who drove up around lunchtime on Friday said he doesn’t usually shop at yard sales, but his wife told him about Blackmon’s tools after she stopped by earlier in the day.

The man had recently bought a tractor and was looking for parts. After several minutes of haggling, he drove away with the chains he needed.

Before leaving, he noted that his wallet was a bit lighter but that his wife had said to call if he needed more money.

“Oh, well what else do you need?” Blackmon said with a laugh, sweeping his hand across the tool table.