Jasper woman prepares to turn 100
by Jennifer Cohron
Sep 30, 2012 | 3815 views | 0 0 comments | 15 15 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Ruby Taylor of Jasper sits on her front porch last week reflecting on turning 100 on Thursday. Photo by: Jennifer Cohron
Ruby Taylor of Jasper sits on her front porch last week reflecting on turning 100 on Thursday. Photo by: Jennifer Cohron
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Ruby Taylor has 100 years worth of stories to tell.

Taylor, who officially passes the century mark on Thursday, was born in the mining camp of west Corona.

In an era when getting a high school education was much less common than it is today, Taylor was valedictorian of a class of 13 graduates in Eldridge.

“One of the best little towns in Alabama,” Taylor said of the place where she was raised.

Taylor had plans to continue her education at an all-girls school in Livingston but married instead. She and her husband lived with relatives for several months until community members built them a log cabin in McCollum, where their son and daughter were raised.

Taylor was widowed at 37. She went to work for 50 cents an hour at the Dairy Queen in downtown Jasper to support her daughter and son, who were then 14 and 10.

When the couple who owned the restaurant decided to sell it several years later, Taylor became the new owner. She continued to operate the business until she retired at 62.

Retirement allowed Taylor more time for her many hobbies, such as gardening, cooking and spending time with her family.

Taylor has seven grandchildren, 15 great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren. She has been at the birth of every one.

The whole clan is expected to attend her birthday party this week, one of several events planned in her honor.

As she approaches 100, Taylor still lives independently, has no major health problems and doesn’t require any medications stronger than an aspirin.

She can often be found working in her yard, which is filled with a variety of beautiful flowers that draw dozens of on-lookers down her dead-end street each spring.

Taylor enjoys rooting on the Crimson Tide on Saturdays and attending church at Midway Church of Christ on Sundays.

However, her most precious memories from a century of living revolve around her loved ones.

“The time to love them is when you’ve got them. It’s too late after they’re gone. I love all of mine and they know it,” Taylor said.