Curry students cast votes in mock election
by RACHEL DAVIS
Oct 31, 2012 | 2342 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Every student at Curry Elementary School got a chance to cast their “vote” for President of the United States on Tuesday, while learning about the process for electing national officials. – Photo by Rachel Davis.
Every student at Curry Elementary School got a chance to cast their “vote” for President of the United States on Tuesday, while learning about the process for electing national officials. – Photo by Rachel Davis.
slideshow
CURRY — Curry Elementary students cast their votes for President on Tuesday, a week before the actual election.

The results will be announced Friday, but they are less important than teaching the students about the process of electing the President.

“We have been teaching the students about the election process,” Principal Steve Rowe said. “We encouraged our students to really talk about it with their parents and decide which way to vote.”

Rowe also said the cost of the program was negligible, approximately $40, for the more than 600 students to receive an invaluable lesson about the election process.

Officials with Studies Weekly, the group that conducts the nationwide test and tallies the votes, said their research shows that students who “vote” every four years as a part of their education are more likely to vote and make informed decisions as adults.

This is the third mock election that Studies Weekly has conducted. In 2004, almost 300,000 students accurately predicted the winner of the Presidential race. In 2008, more than six million students voted, accurately predicting Barack Obama as the winner of the election.

As part of the program, some students created voter identification cards to bring to the polls to be checked against the “voter list” of registered students.

Although the final results were not available as of press time Tuesday, and many states were unable to vote because of the severe storms plaguing the eastern United States, the site was showing Obama as the leader late Tuesday night. There were only a small percentage of votes tallied at that time.

Because of the storm issues, the election was extended until Friday and the final tally will be announced at that time. For more information on the process and to see updated results as they become available, visit Studies Weekly’s website at www.studiesweekly.com.